Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Market-based Approach to Hunger Relief

Jason Krasilovsky, left, and Victor Marshall, Fannie Mae volunteers, chop onions at the DC Central Kitchen. The potatoes and onions come from Toigo Orchards and Farms in Shippensburg, Pa. (By Kevin Clark -- The Washington Post)
Jason Krasilovsky, left, and Victor Marshall, Fannie Mae volunteers, chop onions at the DC Central Kitchen. The potatoes and onions come from Toigo Orchards and Farms in Shippensburg, Pa. (By Kevin Clark -- The Washington Post)
One of the reasons why I love the D.C. Central Kitchen is that they're on the cutting edge of not just the non-profit sector, but the world overall. This powerful article talks about how their Farm Cooperative, which buys produce seconds from regional farmers, has been helping them to achieve remarkable savings while also improving food quality... something they were doing WAY before the "slow food" revolution got popular:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/05/23/AR2008052302567.html

If you are involved with a hunger relief organization such as a food pantry, soup kitchen or food bank, I strongly encourage you to consider ways that local produce can reduce your costs while also supporting the place that you call home.

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